D.C. -- A Capitol Place to Work

Washington, D.C. has long been notorious for two reasons -- its oppressive summer humidity, and the excesses and escapades of its politicians. Today, if you can turn on your air conditioner and turn off your TV and radio, you can live a fairly normal life here, especially if you're looking for work in the high-tech sector. According to the D.C. Chamber of Commerce,...

Cosmopolitan Tulsa -- A Thriving and Diversified City

Okay, so there was a 5.3 percent drop in mining jobs last year in Tulsa, Oklahoma, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). But these days, mining accounts for less than two percent of the 400,000 jobs in this booming metropolitan area of almost 800,000 residents. Almost every other sector of Tulsa's job market shows a steady increase. In fact, according...

Meeting Opportunity in Toronto

Call it Silicon Valley North. Or Hollywood North. Or simply call it what the earliest inhabitants of Lake Ontario's shores did -- Toronto: "place of meeting." Today, the name is more apropos than ever. Toronto thrives as an international commerce center and city of heady cultural convergence. Even the United Nations hailed it as the most multicultural city in the...

Pinellas County: Tampa's Neighbor Predicts Job Growth and Need for Basic Skills

Pinellas County -- located across the Bay from the larger, better-known city of Tampa -- is known primarily for the tourist-haven cities of Clearwater and St. Petersburg, but it is also a driving economic force in the life of the central Florida area, touting: 900,000 residents A work force of 460,000, 27% of whom are in the 25 to 44 age range A 10% increase in the...

The Seattle Picture

Even when Seattle's biggest employer takes a hit, the local economy barely feels it -- thanks to Microsoft and its progeny. The software industry is not the biggest employer in this hub on Puget Sound, but it's the engine that keeps the economy humming, even when Boeing takes a dip. The aerospace company -- Seattle's largest employer -- has clipped its work force by...

Seattle -- Percolating on the Pacific

Home to Starbucks, a coffee guzzler's haven, perhaps Seattle's second quarter 2000 economic results should be called "The Big Gulp." Greater Seattle can look forward to a percolating economy thanks, in part, to its two largest companies, Microsoft and Boeing. Swallowing a few dregs as though they were double latt├ęs, these companies represent the region's largest...

San Diego: Sunny Forecast Ahead -- For the Economy and the Weather

Sunny, temperate California weather is certainly one of San Diego's attractions. But it offers so much more than its fabulous climate. The city's growth statistics are currently dominated by telecommunications, software and biotech, with the median age of its young, technology-focused population being 32. Great pedestrian corridors with street-level retail and a...

San Antonio -- Old West Charm and New World Economy

Old West charm and a New World economy pair up in San Antonio to produce one of the most attractive job markets in the country. In May, Forbes magazine placed San Antonio eighth among the 200 best places to do business, based on technology company revenues, salary increases and job growth between 1993 and 1999. Bolstering this ranking has been the city's economic...

Viva Salt Lake City

The glittering, saline-laden lake in northwest Utah may be dead in ecological terms, but its namesake city remains vibrantly alive. Salt Lake City's more than 173,000 people powered the state's feverish growth during the so-called "roaring '90s." Indeed, the years from 1993 to 1998 saw unprecedented rates of job creation, low unemployment and net migration into the...

Raleigh Rides R&D Trolley

Among the fastest growing cities in the nation, Raleigh, North Carolina, was named by Fortune magazine as the sixth best U.S. city for business in November 1998. The city's population increased 30.1 percent from 1990 to 1999, or an average of 3.34 percent annually. Raleigh is proud that new workers are arriving en masse from places such as New York and California,...

Princeton -- An Intelligent Approach to Life

Best known for the college that shares its name, Princeton, New Jersey, offers more than just a good education. The Township of Princeton is an economically strong community spanning 16.5 square miles in the heart of central New Jersey. It surrounds the 1.85 square mile area of the Borough of Princeton, but the two municipalities are completely separate political...

Portland: An Environmental and Manufacturing Hub

Flanked by the Columbia and Willamette rivers, and with the Pacific Ocean just 78 miles to the west, Portland, Oregon, is a mecca for those who enjoy outdoor sports, such as: Camping Fishing Hiking River rafting Biking Skiing Wind surfing Portland's metro area has 37,000 acres of parks, including one of the largest urban parks in the nation -- Forest Park -- that...

Pittsburgh: The Steel's Gone -- Get Over It!

"I been a-workin' that Pittsburgh steel," Woody Guthrie sang to a wandering worker in his 1940s song, Hard Travellin'. If he came through the city nowadays, chances are his lyrics would be something like, "I been a-livin' that Pittsburgh good life." Once known for its steel industry and little else, Pittsburgh now boasts a number of thriving industries, including...

Phoenix -- Diverse Economy, Thriving Business Climate

The Phoenix Chamber of Commerce proudly touts the city as "one of the most vibrant and livable communities in the United States." For decades, visitors have come to Phoenix in search of the myriad recreational activities the region offers, as well as for its dry, sunny climate. Last year, Arizona attracted 25.6 million leisure and business travelers, who poured...

Orlando -- Mouseketeers Just Part of the Tale

When you say Orlando, most people think Disney World. And when you talk about jobs in Orlando, people talk about Disney, which employs a veritable "city" of 55,000 people. But Disney is only one job vendor in this booming Central Florida economy. "There's growth in every direction," says Philis Intro, research director for the Economic Development Commission (EDC)...